If a court convicts you of a crime, then you face the potential of serving time in jail or prison. In some cases, though, the court decides that it will release you back into the community. However, you will usually be under some type of supervision by law enforcement or the court to ensure that you have no further criminal activity. 

Probation and parole are quite common options, according to the New Hampshire Department of Corrections. They are not the only options, though. The court has a variety of community-based sanctions it could impose upon you. Each of these options attempts to allow you to live in the community and to become a more productive member of society while also serving time for your conviction. 

Intensive supervision 

Intensive supervision is a type of probation that requires additional reporting. You will likely report to your probation officer once a week, sometimes more. You also will have random home visits and may face stricter requirements under this type of probation. 

Community Correction Centers 

Community Correct Centers or halfway houses allow you to live outside a jail or prison. However, you live in a home with other people who have criminal convictions. You must follow set rules and guidelines for living in the house. 

The Academy 

The Academy is a program that you attend while on release from jail or prison. You can still live in your own home and attend the program. It will cover topics related to your needs, such as living skills and employment assistance. 

Home confinement 

Home confinement is better known as house arrest. If you get this type of punishment, you will have to wear a monitor that allows the court to always know where you are at all times. If you leave the area in which the court ordered you to stay, the monitor will alert authorities and you will face an arrest and additional charges.